The course will provide opportunities for teacher instruction / continued feedback /
peer evaluation / and student revision of papers to include the following:
1. To write in several forms (narrative, expository, analytical, and argumentative
essays) about a variety of subjects (public policies, popular culture, personal
experience)
2. To write essays that proceed through several stages or drafts with revision aided
by teacher and peers

3. To engage in research skills, particularly, the ability to evaluate, use, cite
primary and secondary sources to produce an analytical research essay. These
projects will go beyond the parameters of a traditional research paper by
presenting an argument that includes the analysis and synthesis of ideas from
an array of source
4. To develop the skills of using a variety of sentence structures, including
appropriate use of subordination and coordination
5. To develop the skills of using logical organization, enhanced by specific
techniques to increase coherence, such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis
6. To develop the skills of using a balance of generalization and specific,
illustrative detail
7. To develop the skills of effectively using rhetoric, including controlling tone,
establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis
through diction and sentence structure

IB/AP LANGUAGE AND COMPOSTION
IB / AP ENGLISH 3 COURSE SYLLABUS
PLEASE NOTE: This course prepares students for success on both the Standard
Level International Baccalaureate English A1 exam and the Advanced
PlacementLanguage and Composition taken in May of the junior year.
ONGOING
ASSIGNMENTS

· AP Lit Binder with notes, returned essays, AP lit terms list, instructional
handouts, and returned AP practice multiple choice quizzes and AP free response
essays: I shall conduct graded spot checks of this binder throughout the year.

· Class opening activities every day, using AP lit terms, note cards on a binder ring.
Students will be issued a list of literary and rhetorical terms previously used on
AP exams or applied in literature studied.

· Frequent practice with AP style multiple choice questions and free response
prompts: Sources will include released AP Language exams, Applied Practice
manuals, and other multiple choice / essay guides.

· DBQ Binder, checked every 6 weeks—students will selfselect
six topics based on
global, economic, cultural significance. They will collect at least five documents
and three genres each six weeks. These documents may be obtained from daily
newspapers, online
essays, magazines, political cartoons, editorials. They will
also maintain a chart which lists the articles, the attitude toward the subject
(pro/con), the date of the publication, the source (MLA documentation), and the
genre of the piece. Each six weeks the pupils will write a persuasive, analytical
40 minute timed writing on one topic, sometimes selfselected,
sometimes teacher
selected. These papers will be graded by the AP rubric for this new synthesis
format of response. Sometimes, peer evaluations and grading will replace the
instructor’s review of the work. At least one DBQ essay per semester will be
reviewed by the teacher and students after the first draft, allowing the pupils to
revise and rewrite their papers. (1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Vocabulary lists will be given weekly, but vocabulary is primarily the pupil’s
responsibility. Follow these guidelines: When reading or when given an
assignment that contains words that he does not know, the student should enter
them in the vocabulary section of his notebook. Assignments on readings will
never be so easy that someone will not encounter new words. As a scholar, the
pupil will define the word and write the sentence or an original one. Only one
major list will be given per six weeks; and the student will be expected to learn
these as they relate to the unit which is being studied. Each two weeks I test these
words and grade this section of the notebook. Students are expected to apply the
terms they are learning through effective writing and analyses.

· Readings, primarily nonfiction,
will be assigned as they relate to various writing
assignments. Reading will be taken from various texts, paperbacks, and
handouts.(1)

· Assertion JournalsDuring
the first four cycles, students will receive one
quotation per week from a writer whom we will be studying sometime during the
course of the year. For each quotation, students must provide a clear explanation
of the writer’s assertion, then defend or challenge it, noting the complexity of the
issue and acknowledging any possible objections to the student’s point of view.
These short writings will be 300400
words, enough to practice a key concept in
argumentation: acknowledging other points of view. This ongoing
assignment
also emphasizes the correct balance of generalization and specific examples /
details. As students become more comfortable with these informal pieces of
writing and as we review the components of clarity and style, students must
include one example of each of the following syntactical techniques in their
assertion journals: coordination, subordination, varied sentence beginnings,
periodic sentence and parallelism.(1,6,5,4,3,2,7)

· Independent ReaderResponse
JournalsStudents
will also keep a personal
ReaderResponse
Journal. It should not be a part of the regular notebook.
Sometimes students will turn in entries from the notebook. It should be kept so
that anyone could read it and be impressed with the clarity, sight, and sense of
address, which characterizes all effective writing, both fiction and nonfiction.
This is the place where students will free write about selected quotations, novels,
speeches, essays and poems. Journal pages must represent serious effort both in
content and form. Ideas for longer papers may come from the Assertion Journal,
the ReaderResponse
Journal, from inclass
writing, from assigned papers, and
from practice AP writings. We shall have spot checks, often completed by peer
evaluations that look for a balance of generalization and specific, illustrative
detail.(4,5,6,7)

· HomeworkHomework
exists every night of each semester; there will always be
an essay, speech, or article to read and interpret. There is always a composition at
some stage in the writing process on which to work(2,4,5,6,7); there are numerous
usage rules to review, to relearn, and to analyze each week(4,5); and there is a
notebook to keep organized.

· For each grading cycle, a list of essays, articles, speeches, and other genre of
short pieces is included. Not all selections will be used by any one class;
however, each class will read several of these pieces either as homework or as an
inclass
assignment. Sometimes, the reading will be monitored by AP style
multiple choice questions; sometimes, the students will write original AP style
multiple choice questions; other times, they will write a paraphrase of each
section; or they may be assigned an AP style essay, which shall either be teachergraded
or peer evaluated by the AP grading rubrics. Students must revise
corrected essays and keep the original and the revision in the writer’s portfolio
kept in class for individual conferences and monitoring of progress throughout
the year.(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

TEXTBOOKS AND SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

· Kinsella, Kate, et. al. Literature: Timeless Themes, Timeless Voices: The
British Tradition. New York: Prentice Hall, 2000. (Supplemental text)

· Elements of Language. 6th Course. New York: Holt, 2001.

· Adventures in English Literature . New York: HBJ, 1989.

· SAT computer generated list / personal collection of 36 sections with 40 words
per section (Students usually prepare for 80 words every two weeks.)

· Cohen, Samuel. 50 Essays: A Portable Anthology. Bedford: St. Martin’s Press,
2004. (College text)

· Kennedy, X. J., et al., eds. The Bedford Reader. Boston: Bedford / St. Martin’s,
2000/ (District college text)

· Applied Practice manuals: www.appliedpractice.com

· Roskelly, Hephzibah, and David Joliffe. Everyday Use: Rhetoric at Work in
Reading and Writing. New York: Bedford / St. Martin’s

· Dean, Nancy. Voice Lessons: Classroom Activities to Teach Diction, Detail,
Imagery, Syntax, and Tone. Gainesville, Fla: Maupin House, 2000.

PAPERBACKS

· Pa Chin, Family

· Sophocles, Oedipus Rex (preferably the Paul Roche translation)

· Anonymous, Everyman

· Eliot, T. S., Murder in the Cathedral

· Chaucer, Geoffrey, Canterbury Tales – including all tales written

· Kafka, Franz, Metamorphosis

· Calvino, Italo, Our Forefathers Trilogy (Nonexistent Knight, Cloven Viscount,
Baron in the Trees

· Marlowe, Christopher, Dr. Faustus (with the Robin and Dick scenes)

· Shakespeare, William, Hamlet

· Shakespeare, William, Macbeth

· Shelley, Mary, Frankenstein

· Camus, Albert, The Stranger

· Sartre, No Exit

· Beckett, Samuel, Waiting for Godot

· Shaw, G.B., Pygmalion

SUMMER READING

· Hardy, Thomas, Return of the Native

· Bronte, Charlotte, Wuthering Heights

FILMS

· Becket

· Macbeth

· Hamlet

· Beckett Directs Beckett—Waiting for Godot

· My Fair Lady

Thematic excerpts from 50 Essays and will be used throughout each semester in addition
to some chronological readings from school issued supplemental texts. The thematic
essays excerpted from The Bedford Reader and will be adapted to each cycle depending
on the daily readings for the cycle or used independently. For example, thematic
selections on government from 50 Essays will work well with the cycle 2 material on
Oedipus. The thematic material on nature and ethics will work well with the material on
the Anglo Saxon era or Canterbury Tales.(1)

Sample Excerpts

NATURE AND ENVIRONMENT

· Once More to the Lake – E.B. White

· Where I Lived and What I Lived For – Henry David Thoreau

· Dwellings – Linda Hogan

· Letter to President Pierce, 1855 – Chief Seattle
ETHICS

· The Ways We Lie – Stephanie Ericsson

· Letter from a Birmingham Jail – Martin Luther King Jr.

· The Media and the Ethics of Cloning – Leigh Turner
EDUCATION

· How to Tame a Wild Tongue – Gloria Anzaldua

· On Keeping a Notebook – Joan Didion

· Learning to Read and Write – Frederick Douglass

· The Allegory of the Cave – Plato

· Aria: Memoir of a Childhood – Richard Rodriguez
GENDER

· Ain’t I a Woman? – Sojourner Truth

· Barbie Doll – Marge Piercy

· Not all Men are Sly Foxes – Armin A. Brott

· In Search of Our Mothers Gardens –Alice Walker

· In Harness: The Male Condition – Herb Goldberg
CULTURAL IDENTITY

· How It Feels To be Colored Me – Zora Neale Hurston

· The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria – Judith Ortiz

· Notes of a Native Speaker – Eric Liu

· Close Encounters with US Immigration – Adnan R. Khan
POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

· Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions – Elizabeth Cady Stanton

· The Morals of a Prince – Niccolo Machiavelli

· Two Ways to Belong in America – Bharati Mukherejee

· The Roots of War – Barbara Ehrenreich

· Clashing Civilizations – Edward Said

A CHRONOLOGICAL AND THEMATIC, READING AND WRITING
SKILLS LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION SYLLABUS
RATIONALE: Emphasis on historical periods and thematic readings are both critical to
a student’s ability to write effective rhetorical analyses. If students learn to use accurate
historical evidence to support their assertions based on the questions asked in the AP
Language prompt, then they are more likely to “nail” the author’s purpose and the thesis,
(theme and tone).

INITIAL READING & WRITING: Students will be given an excerpt from Hunger of
Memory by Richard Rodriguez. The course will begin by having students discuss the
significance of Rodriguez’s 1980s piece in terms of their own experiences with language
acquisition, reading and writing.

Introduction to The Socratic Seminar and Literature Circles: We will begin with
discussions of identity, group dynamics ,“unwanted” countrymen, all relevant current
issues that directly relate to the alienation and disputes of both Greek society in Oedipus,
family conflicts in Family, and class struggles in Beowulf and Canterbury Tales, all
current issues as well. Students will examine/discuss and explore common issues in
Rodriguez’s essay on family and the excerpt from Days of Obligation, the 1991 & 2004
AP Language prompts along with the excerpted quote from Blood and Belonging, by
Michael Ignatieff (2004 AP Language and Composition, Form B, persuasive essay
Question # 3).(1,3)

PATTERN OF COURSE ORGANIZATION

1ST Semester: Chronological survey of British literature / Genre: Novels and
Tragedies / Summer Reading, Vocabulary Review, Grammar Review, AP style free
response essays and multiple choice selections, Anglo Saxon literature, Beowulf,
Everyman, Oedipus Rex, Canterbury Tales Family, Calvino trilogy (Nonexistent
Knight, Cloven Viscount, Baron in the Trees), Metamorphosis, Murder in the
Cathedral, Return of the Native, Wuthering Heights, related readings from 50 Essays,
The Bedford Reader

1st 6 weeks

· INTRODUCTION TO RHETORICAL ANALYSIS : Review and Lecture on
Aristotle’s Five Canons of Rhetoric: Invention, Memory, Style, Delivery, and
Arrangement (from the workshop by David Joliffe).

· INTRODUCTION TO SOAPSTONE , developed by Tommy Boley and included
in the College Board’s PreAP
Interdisciplinary Workshop for English and Social
Studies, this approach is useful for analyzing prose and visual texts. {Speaker,
Occasion, Audience, Purpose, Subject, Tone}

· INTRODUCTION TO OPTIC : The acronym stands for Overview, Parts, Title,
Interrelationships, and Conclusion. (Optic) from Walter Pauk’s book How to
Study in College. It provides students with key concepts to think about when
approaching any kind of visual art. Using Picturing Texts, students will practice
strategies for analyzing visual arguments and reading images, advertisements,
paintings, and photographs. Students will analyze at least one visual image
related to the themes each cycle.

· INTRODUCTION TO THE SYNTAX ANALYSIS CHART : A key strategy
mentioned in The AP Vertical Teams Guide for English, published by the College
Board, this chart involves creating a fivecolumn
table with the following
headings: Sentence Number, First Four Words, Special Features, Verbs, and
Number of Words per Sentence. This tool helps students connect style to meaning
and identify various writing problems (repetitiveness, possible runons
or
fragments, weak verbs, and lack of syntactical variety.(1,3)

· AP Language Exam Free Responses:

Orwell/Ghandi

1992 AP Language free response: “Queen Elizabeth to Her Troops”
1998 AP Language Exam free response: Madame Merle/Isabel Archer on
“The Self.”

AP Language exam Multiple Choice Practice: excerpts from “Sinners in
the Hands of An Angry God,” in Applied Practice, American Speeches,
pp. 1416.

Also, selected multiple choice pieces based on the AP Language Released
Exams, provided by AP Strategies, Inc.

· FOCUS ON RHETORICAL TERMS: metaphor, anaphora, allusion,
euphemism, simile, rhetorical question, Biblical and mythological allusions.

· Discussion of Beowulf and Family as rhetoric: a discussion of the socioculutural
climates during AngloSaxon
times and the early 20th Chinese society.
This review ill also include the subtleties in the works as the writers grapple with
personal struggles and with the hardships of other victims in the political and
cultural environments (1,6).

· Paper that is a miniresearch,
persuasive paper over an assigned reading from
the Summer Reading assignments of Wuthering Heights and Return of the Native.
Use evidence from your reading to support your assertions. Be sure to provide
relevant detailed arguments, historical data and sound reasoning as a part of
your commentary. Student papers will be evaluated / revised for proper balance
of generalization and specific, illustrative detail, improved skills in use of a
variety of sentence structures, including subordination and coordination, logical
organization, coherence, repetition, transitions, and emphasis, as well as skills in
maintaining voice and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and
sentence structure. All papers will be revised prior to final submission, following
studentteacher
writing conferences.(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Topic A: Love makes the world go ‘round.

· Topic B: “Those who are well educated should have more rights and privileges
that those who are not.” Defend, refute, or qualify this statement.

· A NOTE ABOUT STYLE: A major component of writing, students review the use
of appositive phrases, participial phrases, and absolute phrases to improve the
quality and sophistication of their writing. Initially, students imitate published
writers; later they are expected to highlight their use of these phrases in their
essays. Students will also receive instruction on how to incorporate figures of
rhetoric into their writing, particularly the following: parallelism, isocolon,
antithesis, zeugma, anastrophe, parenthesis, ellipsis, asyndeton, polysyndeton,
alliteration, anaphora, epistrophe, anadiplosis, antimetabole, chiasmus, erotema,
hypophora, and epiplexis; our study of tropes includes metaphor, simile,
synecdoche, metonymy, antonomasia (periphrasis), personification, anthimeria,
litotes, irony, oxymoron, and paradox.(3,4,5,6,7)

· Beowulf

· AngloSaxon
literature selections

· Everyman

· Family

· Summer Reading Wuthering Heights and Return of the Native

· SAT List: Sections 16

· Survey of British Literature through the Medieval period

· Structured Sentence Combining Writings, using various stylistic techniques, such
as anaphora, antithesis, nominative absolutes, dependent clauses, participial
phrases—This assignment improves writing techniques of coordination,
coherence, subordination, transitions, and it serves as a quick reading response
to a piece of literature, offering a point of view from one of the characters and a
rhetorical strategy of ethos, pathos, or logo.(4,5,6,7).

· AP multiple choice and free response essay activities

· Bedford Reader and 50 Essay readings(1): Writing assessments vary during the
year: Students focus on the theme of an essay and relate this idea to their own
experiences and /or other readings. OR, students use one paragraph from an
essay as the basis for the structure of their own writing on a current reading.
OR, students write a literary critique of the passage, noting how structure,
syntax, diction, literary devices, rhetorical appeals create the writer’s attitudes
toward a subject. Often these papers are journal entries; one work per six weeks
will be revised after peer evaluations and submitted for grading by the teacher.
(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

Nature and Environment: White, “Once More to the Lake”

Hogan, ”Where I Lived and What I Lived for”

Ethics: Turner, “The Ethics of Cloning”

Education: Douglass: “Learning to Read and Write”

2 nd 6 weeks— Persuasion

· AP Language Review done both in class and at home

AP Language Exam 1998 Free Response – Charles Lamb’s reply to
Wordsworth

AP Language Exam: persuasive essay King Lear prompt, the relationship
between wealth and justice.

AP Language Exam free response: analyzing an argument – Alfred
Green’s speech to African Americans.

AP Language Exam persuasive essay – Does entertainment have the
capacity to ruin society?

AP Language Multiple Choice Practice based on the following speeches
from Applied Practice, American Speeches, pp. 112;
MLK’s “I Have a
Dream, Patrick Henry’s Speech In the Virginia Convention in 1175 and
John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address on January 20th, 1961.

· Focus on Literary and Rhetorical Terms: pejorative diction, inflated language,
colloquial diction, elevated and erudite diction, allusive diction, emotional
diction, hyperbole, aphorism, invective, and simile

· Oedipus Rex

· Metamorphosis

· Murder in the Cathedral

· SAT List: Sections 712

· Survey of British Literature from the Renaissance to the 18th century

· Bedford and 50 Essay selections Bedford Reader and 50 Essay readings(1):
Writing assessments vary during the year: Students focus on the theme of an
essay and relate this idea to their own experiences and /or other readings. OR,
students use one paragraph from an essay as the basis for the structure of their
own writing on a current reading. OR, students write a literary critique of the
passage, noting how structure, syntax, diction, literary devices, rhetorical appeals
create the writer’s attitudes toward a subject. Often these papers are journal
entries; one work per six weeks will be revised after peer evaluations and
submitted for grading by the teacher. (1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

Gender:

· “Barbie Doll” by Marge Piercy

· “Not all Men are Sly Foxes” by Amin Brett

Cultural Identity:

· “Notes of a Native Speaker” Eric Lu

Politics / Government:

· “The Morals of a Prince” by Barbara Ehrenreich

Major essay assignment: Find three literary critiques of one of the works studied
this 6 weeks. Using at least one quotation from each critic and at least two
specific examples from the work, agree, disagree, or qualify the concept that in
the last century life has become a nightmarish existentialist existence. After the
first draft, peer evaluations will be held to identify use of research skills in using
primary and secondary sources, an original argument that includes the analysis
and synthesis of ideas from an array of sources, establishment and maintaining of
voice, appropriate use of diction, sentence structure, use of generalization and
specific detail, a variety of sentence structures, subordination, coordination,
repetition, coherence, transitions, and logical organization (1,2,3,4,5,6,7).

Structured Sentence Combining Writings, using various stylistic techniques, such
as anaphora, antithesis, nominative absolutes, dependent clauses, participial
phrases—This assignment improves writing techniques of coordination,
coherence, subordination, transitions, and it serves as a quick reading response
to a piece of literature, offering a point of view from one of the characters and a
rhetorical strategy of ethos, pathos, or logos.(4,5,6,7)

3 rd 6 weeks— Narrative Biography and SelfAssessment

· AP Exam reviews (Multiple choice, free response)

AP Language Exam free response 1991,
Mary Oliver’s Owls

AP Language Exam free response 2002
from Testaments Betrayed,
Milan Kundera

AP Language 2006 exam: rhetorical analysis – Flamingo Passage

AP Language Multiple Choice Exam practice—Applied Practice,
American Speeches,

pp. 2026:
Richard Nixon’s 1952 Checkers Speech and Clarence Darrow’s
1924 oration in defense of Leopold and Loeb

· Paper: Students will review/collect newspaper and magazine clippings on our
current war in Iraq, particularly U.S. foreign policy since 911 as well as visual
images of both war casualties and tributes to fallen citizens. Following their early
semester preliminary review of our war efforts, students will take a position on
whether or not our current situation is viable, sustainable, moral and justified.
Before writing a final draft, students will evaluate the soundness of their sources,
discuss their positions in both large and small group settings, continue to explore
the facts, and consider the limitations and politics of our media as the medium
and the message. War Synthesis Question, provided by AP Strategies, Inc.

(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Focus on Literary and Rhetorical Terms : parallelism, bandwagon appeal,
anticipating an objection, concrete examples, syllogistic reasoning, inductive
reasoning, cause and effect reasoning, deductive reasoning, circular reasoning
and ethical appeals. Also drama, pathos, sarcasm, sardonic wit, witticisms,
rhetorical interest. Anytime you focus on terms, you have to show how they
achieve a certain purpose in an actual text rather than just learning the terms;
however, student must first familiarize themselves with these terms and then
understanding and apply them in their own writing. This process involves
reviewing the terms with them using examples from the Handbook to Literature,
having them recognize rhetorical devices as they read, and apply them through
rhetorical analysis(4,5,6,7).

· Canterbury Tales – “Prologue” in Middle English and all the tales

· Calvino trilogy: Nonexistent Knight, Cloven Viscount, Baron in the Trees

· SAT List: Sections 1318

· Complete survey of British Literature to the Romanticism period

· AP multiple choice and free response essay activities

· Narrative Autobiography of the pupil, using quotations, noting differences
between generalizations and specific, illustrative details, and using effective
organization, coherence, subordination, coordination, transitions. This paper
will be kept on file and revised at the end of the spring semester to fit college
entrance application questions. (1,2,4,5,6,7)

· Structured Sentence Combining Writings, using various stylistic techniques, such
as anaphora, antithesis, nominative absolutes, dependent clauses, participial
phrases—This assignment improves writing techniques of coordination,
coherence, subordination, transitions, and it serves as a quick reading response
to a piece of literature, offering a point of view from one of the characters and a
rhetorical strategy of ethos, pathos, or logos.(4,5,6,7)

· Bedford Reader and 50 Essay readings(1): Writing assessments vary during the
year: Students focus on the theme of an essay and relate this idea to their own
experiences and /or other readings. OR, students use one paragraph from an
essay as the basis for the structure of their own writing on a current reading.
OR, students write a literary critique of the passage, noting how structure,
syntax, diction, literary devices, rhetorical appeals create the writer’s attitudes
toward a subject. Often these papers are journal entries; one work per six weeks
will be revised after peer evaluations and submitted for grading by the teacher.
(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

2ND SEMESTERChronological
survey of British literature / Genre: Tragedies,
Comedy plays / Existentialist novels, Intensive AP review, Dr. Faustus, Macbeth,
Hamlet, No Exit, Waiting for Godot, Frankenstein, The Stranger, Pygmalion (My
Fair Lady), survey of literature from the late 18th Century to the present day,
grammar review, vocabulary review, AP format multiple choice exams and free
response essays
4 t h 6 weeks Is
Everything An Argument?

· Shelley, Mary, Frankenstein

· Marlowe, Dr. Faustus

· Shakespeare, Macbeth

· Literary extended analytical essay: Comparison / Contrast of themes,
stylistic techniques, literary devices, rhetorical appeals to agree,
disagree, or qualify the belief that Shakespeare and Marlowe were the
same person. Alternate essay is to select three specific scenes from
Macbeth, identify how the tone is created, and relate those tones to
studentselected
music. Students will burn a CD of the music as part of
the assignment. This paper will be one that shall undergo several
revisions, after teacher and peer evaluations.(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· SAT List: Sections 1925

· Late 18th Century / Romanticism works

· Structured Sentence Combining Writings, using various stylistic
techniques, such as anaphora, antithesis, nominative absolutes, dependent
clauses, participial phrases—This assignment improves writing
techniques of coordination,
coherence, subordination, transitions, and it
serves as a quick reading response to a piece of literature, offering a
point of view from one of the characters and a rhetorical strategy of
ethos, pathos, or logos.(4,5,6,7)

· AP style multiple choice exams and free response questions
Rhetorical analysis
1988 &1997 AP Language Frederick Douglass prompts – focus on the
apostrophe in paragraph # 3, 1997
AP Language Exam: Zora Neale Hurston 1987 prompt from Dust Tracks
on a Road
2006 AP Language Exam persuasive essay on the meaning of democracy
following a reading of an excerpt from DeToqueville’s Democracy in
America, written in 1835(AP free response question)
AP Multiple Choice Practice: Applied Practice NonFiction
Selections,
pp. 1524,
excerpts from passages where Nathaniel Hawthorne discusses
Abraham Lincoln and from Thoreau’s Walden.

· Paper: Political Cartoons – What are the messages, the rhetoric, the
argument, the bias, and the alternative point of view? An analysis of
visual media using SOAPSTONE and Optic.(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Focus on Literary and Rhetorical Terms: metonymy, conceit,
personification, qualifiers, synecdoche, ellipsis, apostrophe, chiasmus,
paradox, and pun, argument by analogy, epithet, oxymoron, tautology,
parable, didactic, and syllepsis.

5 t h 6 weeks – Stylistic and Rhetorical Analysis

· AP Multiple choice and free response exercises in class and for homework (1)

o APLanguage Exam: two marriage proposals, Jane Austen and Charles
Dickens

o AP Language Exam, Audubon’s and Dillard’s Flocks of Birds

o 2006 AP Language Exam – Hazlitt prompt

o AP Language Exam Multiple Choice practice: Ralph Ellison “Living With
Music” Excerpt from “To the Person Sitting in Darkness,” written by
Samuel Clemens during the “Age of Imperialism,” found in Applied
Practice, NonFiction
Selections, 2001, pp. 3335.

o Students will also read the excerpt from Sir Francis Bacon’s Idol’s of the
Mind, from The New Organon in Applied Practice, NonFiction
Selections, pp. 57.

· Paper: Miniresearch/
persuasion –Does identity define reality? Research the
1930’s2000
era of the development of existentialism. How do the political,
social, and cultural upheavals throughout the world at this time influence the
writers / artists and their works. Refer to specific literary critiques, passages
from the plays and novels for proof. (1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Structured Sentence Combining Writings, using various stylistic techniques, such
as anaphora, antithesis, nominative absolutes, dependent clauses, participial
phrases—This assignment improves writing techniques of coordination,
coherence, subordination, transitions, and it serves as a quick reading response
to a piece of literature, offering a point of view from one of the characters and a
rhetorical strategy of ethos, pathos, or logos.(4,5,6,7)

· Shakespeare, Hamlet

· Sartre, No Exit

· Camus, The Stranger

· SAT List: Sections 2630

· Bedford Reader and 50 Essay readings(1): Writing assessments vary during the
year: Students focus on the theme of an essay and relate this idea to their own
experiences and /or other readings. OR, students use one paragraph from an
essay as the basis for the structure of their own writing on a current reading.
OR, students write a literary critique of the passage, noting how structure,
syntax, diction, literary devices, rhetorical appeals create the writer’s attitudes
toward a subject. Often these papers are journal entries; one work per six weeks
will be revised after peer evaluations and submitted for grading by the teacher.
(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Intensive AP review

6 t h 6 weeks Cumulative Review for AP

· AP Language Exam questions: (1)

Rhetorical analysis – Igor Stravinsky, conductor

Persuasive essay – Book of Ecclesiastes, wisdom and knowledge

Persuasive essay – Susan Sontag, photography

Free response – Coca Cola letters, 1998

Persuasive essay – James Baldwin’s essay on language as a key to
identity.

Multiple Choice Practice: Ralph Ellison’s Charles Parker “Bird”
passage, Kiowa Indians passage by M. Scott Momaday.

· Paper # 4: Addressing the Synthesis Question: Consider one of the novels and
three to five thematicallyrelated
essays you have read this semester and the
pervasive themes and issues unique to their historical and cultural milieu. Select
a representative picture, a painting, a song, a commercial and a pivotal issue
representative of the time during which your novel is set. Then create a motif for
your collection and write a critical argument explaining why this motif/pattern
and theme best represents this novel, author, period and cultural myth/message.
Your essay will be submitted as a portfolio package that contains the forementioned,
wellresearched
representative pieces, as well as a list of relevant
references which have been carefully evaluated for their usefulness as evidence.

Use the researched argument sources (AP Strategies, Inc.) Your synthesis essay
package must cover all aspects of your argument and contain relevant samples
and sources in order to receive full credit. Please include a timeline.
(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Structured Sentence Combining Writings, using various stylistic techniques, such
as anaphora, antithesis, nominative absolutes, dependent clauses, participial
phrases—This assignment improves writing techniques of coordination,
coherence, subordination, transitions, and it serves as a quick reading response
to a piece of literature, offering a point of view from one of the characters and a
rhetorical strategy of ethos, pathos, or logos.(4,5,6,7)

· Bedford Reader and 50 Essay readings(1): Writing assessments vary during the
year: Students focus on the theme of an essay and relate this idea to their own
experiences and /or other readings. OR, students use one paragraph from an
essay as the basis for the structure of their own writing on a current reading.
OR, students write a literary critique of the passage, noting how structure,
syntax, diction, literary devices, rhetorical appeals create the writer’s attitudes
toward a subject. Often these papers are journal entries; one work per six weeks
will be revised after peer evaluations and submitted for grading by the teacher.
(1,2,3,4,5,6,7)

· Beckett, Waiting for Godot

· Shaw, G. B., Pygmalion (My Fair Lady)

· SAT List: Sections 3136

· Intensive AP review

· Narrative Autobiography final rewrite for college application essays(2,4,5,6,7)

WRITER’S NOTEBOOK ORGANIZATION

Using pocket dividers with labels, organize your BINDER as follows:

· Daily Journal (for Quotations and/or Speech and Poetry Prompts

· Grammar and Mechanics

· HomeworkVocabulary (An Ongoing List)

· Class Lecture Notes on Selected Readings

· Writing Workshop Notes and Timed Essays

· Works In Progress (drafts for revision and ultimate placement in portfolio)

· Exams (Place in pockets)

· Use the Dialectical Journal for your novels.

PLAN FOR AP MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTIONS AND FREE RESPONSE
QUESTIONS

Biweekly,
the students will practice AP Language Exam multiple choice questions. To
increase the ability to answer this form of questioning, they will complete reading
strategy activities and will study question types and provide written justifications for
correct answers. For some of the free response essays, the students will be placed on the
honor system, writing the topic at home in a selftimed
atmosphere; other papers will be
written in a timed class setting. Some of these essays will be teacher graded, some peer
graded, all using the AP rubric.(1,2,4,5,6,7)

MAJOR ASSESSMENTS

Students’ performance and level of achievement will be assessed through

· Reading quizzes

· Graded discussions and seminars

· Data Based Document Project (ongoing
research project)

· Timed writings and AP free response prompt essays

· AP multiple choice questions and activities

· Objective / short answer tests on the major works covered

· Extended expository analytical essays on the works

· Comparison / contrast multiple paragraph essays

· Narrative Autobiography writing

· Creative comic book on one work

· Student written objective tests / questions for “Baseball games” over selected
pieces

· Semester final exams – recall AP style multiple choice questions on works
covered in class, identification of sentence forms, new poems, prose pieces –
multiple choice;
Final essay—AP openended
prompt

· Short structured writings with given sentence patterns to test knowledge and skills
of syntactical constructions, grammatical correctness, and reading comprehension

· Literary critiques of formal literary criticism essays over works covered (Students
may find these essays online, avoiding summaries such as those found at
PinkMonkey.com, SparkNotes, BaronNotes, Cliff’sNotes. They may use access
to scholarly sites available with the school librarian’s assistance and the district
internet license or through the Houston Public Library internet license, if they
have a valid county library card and number.

· Biweekly
SAT vocabulary and grammar tests

ASSESSMENT:

I will keep a writing folder for each of you. It will stay in the room. You should keep a
copy of everything you have turned in. Some grades will be determined by the progress
you make and at times I will evaluate your folder and give you a grade over several
writings at one time. Please remember that this is a college level course and you will not
have as many major grades as you have experienced in nonAP
courses in high school.
Therefore, you must do your very best on each and every assignment. You will have five
of ten major grades per six weeks.

THE LANGUAGE OF LITERATURE

Through discussion, written reports, essay examinations, objective tests, and oral and
written projects, the student will demonstrate knowledge of

· Selected works of fiction, nonfiction,
poetry, drama, and film.

· Man’s relationship to himself, to others, and to the universe through identifying
themes in lliterature.

· Man’s values and how he defends these values

· All forms of Rhetorical Analysis and Argumentation.
Through writing, the students will demonstrate concern and involvement with ideas and
values expressed in literature and with those in their own lives.
Through discussions and essays, students will demonstrate ways to analyze literature and
write about literature.
Through written research papers, students will demonstrate skills in the research process.

GENERAL NOTES ON GRADING STANDARDS

I shall grade essays two ways:

· Detailed / formal grading for essays written outside of class. You will receive
two grades—one for content and one for grammar.

CONTENT CRITERIA

40
No thesis sentence at end of the first paragraph
No thesis statement
Thesis is the only sentence in the first paragraph
Thesis is more than one sentence in the first paragraph.
The thesis must be either a simple sentence or a complex (dependent
clause) sentence.
It may not be a compound sentence (more than one main clause).
10
No conclusion paragraph
Each body paragraph lacks a specific topic sentence that includes all
aspects of that paragraph.
Other content errors are subjective. These errors include lack of specific
quotation or examples, inclusion of fewer than two examples per paragraph for
proof, incomplete or missing explanations / elaboration of examples.

GRAMMAR CRITERIA

10
Each error, each occurrence
Sentence fragment
Runonsentence
Comma splice – Use a comma between two main clauses only if joined by
“and, or, but, nor.” Any other conjunction – including “therefore, yet, so,
however, nevertheless” – is a transitional conjunction that requires a semicolon
between two main clauses. “For” is a subordinating conjunction,
meaning “because.”
Lack of agreement Subject / Verb
Lack of agreement Pronoun /Antecedent
(Do not use “them” or “he / she” to replace “everyone, anyone.” Use only
“he”. FORMAL ENGLISH USAGE)
Second person (your / your)
Pointing to self in writing – This writer believes, for example.
Use of contractions
Wrong word –witch for which, too for two, for example
5
All other errors in grammar or punctuation usage each time each error
occurs, including, but not limited to the following:
“this” or “which” to refer to more than one word (faulty reference)
faulty capitalization
lack of parallelism
wrong comma usage
dangling or misplaced modifier
slang or informal English such as “because of, a lot, due to”
use of any form of the “to be” verb, except “being” / passive voice
use of past or past perfect tense in formal essays – literature is a living
entity; use either present tense or present perfect tense (have / has).

HOLISTIC GRADING CRITERIA

For free response writings or quick writes in class I shall use a holistic rubric, based on
the AP grading rubric standards. All of the listed errors for a formal paper will be
considered in the distribution of grades.
Essays will receive a score from 9 – 0. “9” is the highest score available.
9=98
8=92
7=88
6=84
5=80
4=77
3=75
2=70
1=60
Anything below will receive a 50
If a paper is missing, you will receive a “0.”